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The Plant Basis Of Reproduction

Individual plants may be either bisexual (hermaphroditic), in which male and female gametes are produced by the same organism, or unisexual, producing either male or female gametes but not both. A bisexual individual, however, is not necessarily capable of fertilizing its own eggs. In certain ferns, for example, male gametes of one individual are not compatible with the female gametes of the same individual, so cross-fertilization (with another individual of the species) is obligatory. This situation, of course, is similar in adaptive significance to cross-pollination (which leads to cross-fertilization) among seed plants. In the event that you think you need to write my paper on reproduction this article is the ideal asset for it.

Plant Reproduction | BioNinja

Among the liverworts, mosses, and vascular plants, the life cycle involves two different phases, often called generations, although only one plant generation is, in fact, involved in one complete cycle. This type of life cycle is often said to illustrate the “alternation of generations,” in which a haploid individual (i.e., with one set of chromosomes), or tissue, called a gametophyte, at maturity produces gametes that unite in pairs to form diploid (i.e., containing two sets of chromosomes) zygotes. The latter develop directly into individuals, or tissues, called sporophytes, in which the nuclei of certain fertile cells, called spore mother cells, or sporocytes, give rise to haploid spores (sometimes called meiospores). These spores are lightweight and are borne by air currents; they germinate to form the haploid, sexual, gamete-producing phase, usually designated the gametophyte.

There are several variations in the above-described life cycle. The haploid gametophyte and sporophyte may be free-living, independent individuals (e.g., certain algae and yeasts), in which case the life cycle is diplobiontic, or the sporophyte may be physically attached to the gametophyte, as it is in liverworts and mosses. By contrast, the gametophytic phases develop as parasites on the sporophytes of the seed plants, as in certain algae. In further variation, the alternating phases may be similar morphologically except for the type of reproductive cells (gametes or spores) they produce (isomorphic life cycle), or they may be strikingly dissimilar, as in some mosses, ferns, and seed plants (heteromorphic life cycle). Only heteromorphic life cycles occur in liverworts, mosses, vascular plants, and certain fungi. In the event that anybody requests that you write my paper on reproduction just read this blog prior to writing.

The differences between the gametophyte and sporophyte are often great, especially those of the diplobiontic types, so the alternates seem to be two different, unrelated individuals rather than different manifestations of the same organism. This paper writing service additionally writes splendid essays on significant points like reproduction and numerous others.

The plant bodies of liverworts and hornworts represent the gametophytic (sexual) phase of the life cycle, which is dominant in these plants. In the liverworts, the sporophyte is borne upon or within the gametophyte but is transitory. Liverwort and hornwort plants, depending on the species, may be bisexual or unisexual, and the sex organs may be distributed on the surface (RicciaRicciocarpusSphaerocarposPellia) or localized in groups and borne on special branches (antheriodiophores and archegoniophores), as in Marchantia; the sperm cells are biflagellate.