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Franklin Hall

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Franklin Hall

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General Features Of Reproductive Systems

Among liverworts, mosses, lycopods, ferns, and seed plants, few-to many-celled specially organized buds, or gemmae, also serve as agents of asexual reproduction.

The vegetative, or somatic, organs of plants may, in their entirety, be modified to serve as organs of reproduction. In this category belong such flowering-plant structures as stolons, rhizomes, tubers, corms, and bulbs, as well as the tubers of liverworts, ferns, and horsetails, the dormant buds of certain moss stages, and the leaves of many succulents. Stolons are elongated runners, or horizontal stems, such as those of the strawberry, which root and form new plantlets when they make proper contact with a moist soil surface. Rhizomes, as seen in iris, are fleshy, elongated, horizontal stems that grow within or upon the soil. The branching of rhizomes results in multiplication of the plant. The enlarged fleshy tips of subterranean rhizomes or stolons are known as tubers, examples of which are potatoes. Tubers are fleshy storage stems, the buds (“eyes”) of which, under proper conditions, can develop into new individuals. Erect, vertical, fleshy, subterranean stems, which are known as corms, are exemplified by crocuses and gladioli. These organs tide the plants over periods of dormancy and may develop secondary cormlets, which give rise to new plantlets. Unlike the corm, only a small portion of the bulb, as in lilies and the onion, represents stem tissue. The latter is surrounded by the fleshy food-storage bases of earlier-formed leaves. After a period of dormancy, bulbs develop into new individuals. Large bulbs produce secondary bulbs through development of buds, resulting in an increase in number of individuals and in any case, college essay examples on reproduction can be found in various biology books.

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In most plant groups, both sexual and asexual methods of reproduction occur. Some species, however, seem secondarily to have lost the capacity for sexual reproduction. Such cases are described below (see Variations in reproductive cycles).

The cellular basis

Sexual reproduction at the cellular level generally involves the following phenomena: the union of sex cells and their nuclei, with concomitant association of their chromosomes, which contain the genes, and the nuclear division called meiosis. The sex cells are called gametes, and the product of their union is a zygote. All gametes are normally haploid (having a single set of chromosomes) and all zygotes, diploid (having a double set of chromosomes, one set from each parent). Gametes may be motile, by means of whiplike hairs (flagella) or of flowing cytoplasm (amoeboid motion). In their union, gametes may be morphologically indistinguishable (i.e., isogamous) or they may be distinguishable only on the criterion of size (i.e., heterogamous). The larger gamete, or egg, is nonmotile; the smaller gamete, or sperm, is motile. The last type of gametic difference, egg and sperm, is often designated as oogamy. In oogamous reproduction, the union of sperm and egg is called fertilization. Isogamy, heterogamy, and oogamy are often considered to represent an increasingly specialized evolutionary series. In the event that anybody requests that you write my paper on reproduction just read this blog prior to writing.

In the plants included in this article—bryophytes (mosses, hornworts, and liverworts) and tracheophytes (vascular plants)—sexual reproduction is of the oogamous type, or a modification thereof, in which the sex cells, or gametes, are of two types, a larger nonmotile egg and a smaller motile sperm. These gametes are often produced in special containers called gametangia, which are multicellular. In cases in which special gametangia are lacking, every cell produces a gamete. In oogamy, the male gametangia are called antheridia and the female oogonia or archegonia. A female gametangium with a sterile cellular jacket is called an archegonium, although, like an oogonium, it produces eggs. In most of the plants dealt with in this article, the eggs are produced in archegonia and the sperms in antheridia with surface layers of sterile cells. This paper writing service can write magnificent and one of a kind paper on reproduction.